Finding refuge

Fleeing pograms, my family started a new life in America.
Will others get the same chance?

Making a place for community

Kathryn Mariner, a cultural anthropologist, is researching placemaking in the city of Rochester, through Fertile Ground, a visual, large-scale, multi-year project.

Catholic Diocese seeks Chapter 11 relief

Facing sex-abuse claims, the Catholic Diocese of Rochester has asked court protection from creditors while it reorganizes. Still, much remains to be determined as to how the bankruptcy will play out.

Remembering my sister Jane Glazer … as teacher

After Jane and her husband, Larry Glazer, died in a plane crash five years ago today, they were remembered as successful business owners, boosters of downtown and philanthropists. But teaching, Jane’s brother writes, was her lifelong passion. And for those who knew her as teacher and mentor, she had a lasting impact.

How Rochester’s urban revival ranks

In many U.S. regions, good-paying jobs and college-educated people are returning to cities, reversing suburban flight. New research by urban studies expert Richard Florida offers the opportunity to benchmark Rochester against the nation’s largest cities.

For La’Ron Singletary, trust comes first

The new Rochester Police Department leader says he’s “chief for everyone,” but as an African American he understands why some in the community have little faith they will be treated fairly by law enforcement officers. He plans to earn their trust.

Our city of immigrants

The foreign born are inseparable from Rochester’s history and identity. And they could be key to revitalizing a city that has seen both people and jobs migrate elsewhere.

The experience of war through a different lens

“First Light,” an exhibit of photography and writing by women combat veterans in Rochester, explores their stories and gives voice to a largely unacknowledged segment of the community.

Imagining Rochester in 2034 and beyond

For the last decade, the Rochester Speculative Literature Association has nurtured visions of the city’s future. Its members—whose works span fantasy, science fiction and horror fiction—write stories about Rochester that ask “what if?”